Founding Partner of SystemiQ, a new firm dedicated to building sustainable, market-based economies, programme director of the Energy Transitions Commission, lead author of the Better Growth, Better Climate report of the New Climate Economy project, and advisor to multiple governments, companies and foundations on system transformation and resource productivity.  

Jeremy spent over 20 years at McKinsey, developing and leading its Sustainability and Resource Productivity Practice (SRP) from 2007-2015. SRP is accountable for McKinsey’s client and knowledge agenda on green growth, including resource productivity, resilience, climate policy, environmental finance, land-use and ecosystem service strategies, circular “closed loop” business models, clean-tech and energy policy.

Jeremy serves clients across multiple industries, including energy, finance, consumer goods and high-tech. He also works extensively with governments in both developed and developing countries. In 2011, Jeremy co-authored a major report: Resource Revolution: Meeting the World’s Needs for Energy, Food, Water and Materials. His core interest is in unlocking the potential for much better economic systems - whether energy, urban, land-use or industrial - in ways that can meet the needs of over 9 billion people by 2030, accelerate and scale disruptive innovation, and regenerate natural capital.

Jeremy also completed a year’s sabbatical from McKinsey, during which time he led the New Climate Economy Project on behalf of the Global Commission on the Economy & Climate. The purpose of this Project is to help senior economic decision-makers identify and prioritise actions that can deliver better growth and lower climate risk. The Commission’s flagship report: Better Growth, Better Climate was launched in September 2014.

Jeremy is also a former Senior Economist from the World Bank (1988-1993). He holds a first class degree from Cambridge University in Law and Economics (1984) and a Masters’ Degree in Public Administration (1986) from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.